6

This is a very good catch, thanks! I didn't notice the difference when closing the question. If that was all we have in duplicates, I would be OK with reopening. However, we also have at least three questions on transporting food while keeping it crispy: How to keep fried fish warm and crispy during transport to venue?, Crispy fried chicken goes limp: ...


5

tl;dr: If you accidentally put salad on your plate of leftovers before heating, and you had a magic microwave shield, wouldn't you just throw the shield on it? Why can't someone ask if this exists? Full answer: I definitely disagree. Questions can be both valid and fun. Yes, there's an easy, obvious solution to the problem, but it's interesting (and ...


4

I think you've asked about things like this before. There are tons of old questions which (for a variety of reason) would be closed if they were asked today. We're vigilant about voting to close new questions - we see them right there on the front page. But we can't go through all the old questions and find all the ones that should be closed. So the ...


2

I'm the author of the accepted answer on that question and I have to say that I struggled to write it...the physics is moderately complicated which makes it hard to give a satisfying answer that is accessible to the layman. I've just popped over to Physics.SE (where I am a moderator) to poke around the anon/low-rep feed back tools, and this seems to be a ...


2

I think that the answer that's currently there is perfect -- a link to resources to find menus from that era. I see it as an exact equivalent of Where can I find ancient ages/middle ages recipes and preparation techniques? Which would suggest that the question really should be: How can I find out what food would have been served at a dinner held by the ...


2

It's very easy to find on the web what a rubber spatula is, but the question wasn't asking what a rubber spatula is, it was asking to identify the utensil in a photo. You don't specify how you would have proposed that the OP search for an answer through alternative means, and I don't see any obvious route. "Equipment identification" is going to be more or ...


1

I think it's a perfectly good question, unless we're planning on simply declaring commercial food safety off topic. It seems fair to ask if food safety extends to cleaning objects like these, not just normal dishes and the food itself. It asks about specific things. There could well be data about compliance (government food safety inspections do happen, I ...


1

I voted to close it as off-topic. It could indeed be an interesting question, after some editing. But it hasn't been edited—and remember closing is not permanent. Its not only acceptable but encouraged to edit your closed question to fix the problems, then ask for it to be re-opened. Closing is on the pathway to deletion, but only if the problems aren't ...


1

Phrase suggestion: "made less safe" -> "caused to fail an accepted food safety standard that it did not fail in its raw state, AND/OR turned into a food considered perishable under such standards when it was not considered perishable in its raw state." The scope of "cooking" remains to be solved - if you include "distillation", that would add a few more ...


1

That one bugged me, and I was disinclined to answer it. It seemed too obvious to be taken seriously. I did answer it and the upvotes and comments made it worth my while. That indicates something, doesn't it? Answers to really, really stupid questions don't get upvoted.* *Apparently wrong, but sounded good when written.


1

Low research questions are discouraged, although they don't have to be closed outright. However, there is a difference between "low research" and "beginner" questions. "Low research" is something where the user had a very obvious source and didn't check it. For example, if somebody bought a new espresso automatic machine and asks us how to make cappucchino ...


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