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"Seasoned" has two meanings, which makes it very appropriate for this site. One of the main goals of Stack Exchange is to attract professionals and experts in the subjects. One definition of "seasoned" is "experienced". used to describe someone who has a lot of experience of a particular thing The other definition relates more to cooking directly, ...


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What is StackOverflow about? (Hint: not overflowing stacks.) What is ServerFault about? When this network of sites first started, each site had a catchy name that was not simply a description of what it was about. This pattern continued with the first few sites that were not about software development. Cooking.StackExchange.com isn't just called "cooking" - ...


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The quickest way to figure out what a tag was intended to be used for is usually to look at the oldest questions using the tag: https://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/translation?sort=newest (scroll to the bottom) Note that this falls apart when old questions have been re-tagged, but for a tag this rarely used that's easy enough to check for. As ...


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As @Joe said in a comment, which seems to have vanished during the migration of this question to Meta, the name was the winner of the naming contest, culminating in the name Seasoned Advice. For a glimpse at history, they live at The Elevator Pitch, and The (deprecated, closed) previous, seminal question on Meta.Cooking.SE


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I think that this type of question is not off topic for the site. If this was a pure replacement of a dictionary service, I would be against it. But note that cooking terms seldom have a 1:1 translation between languages. OK, so probably a fruit has a name in the languages of all countries where it is available. But when you move into cooked goods, the ...


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