8

I noticed this too - we've been averaging at least one question per day like this - and I proposed in chat this morning that we should just have a canonical question (i.e. "How long can raw meat be safely stored?") and start closing all of these other ones as duplicates. There's absolutely no reason why we need 50 copies of the exact same question with only ...


7

General answer, for all food safety questions: recommend whatever the government food safety agency recommends. If reasonable, you can go on to explain what the risks are of not following that advice - obviously sometimes it's more dangerous than other times. Yes, the government is often overly paranoid, but it's not our job to question their recommendation....


6

Without surveying users here, these questions appear to be predominantly from American users. I think there are cultural differences between the US and Europe that explain some of it, but the differences are due to larger issues than just food. In many countries (e.g. most of the EU), a mild case of food poisoning leads to a couple of days of ...


6

I'm all for this. Both sound good - partial cooking first, or general reheating of presumed safe food. I'm not aware of one existing for either, though I'm sure people have written the answer plenty of times by now on the more specific instances. The general "left at room temperature" one does obliquely address this, but I think it's sometimes tough for ...


5

The question as asked didn't even seem to be a health OR food safety question to me; it basically boiled down to "Why won't this person eat this food?". Maybe it was because of the pregnancy, maybe she's partially lactose intolerant, maybe she just hates soft cheeses, maybe it's because she's on some diet or another, maybe it's because she's a Martian and ...


4

As a preface, I'd distinguish between overly concerned questions and cautious answers. We do indeed get questions where the answer is "no, that's totally fine." There are a lot of people out there in the world, and some of them are naturally going to have incomplete information and be worried based on what they do/don't know. We should be kind when answering ...


4

StackExchange sites are mostly community-moderated, so in general, "can somebody look at this" is reserved for really egregious cases - answers that don't actually answer the question, things with no conceivable value, spam, offensive content, and so on. If you do see things like that, you can ask a moderator to look at them by flagging. Otherwise, voting ...


3

I appreciate the vigilance on food safety issues, but I don't think the question is off topic, although it might not be a very smart question. The first two answers are quality information, and have received the upvotes. The third answer from Violapadrile has not received any upvotes. My opinion is that no action is required here, although some comments ...


2

There is an new one of these right now: I left fully cooked lasagna out all night. What is worrying to me is that several people told the person to go ahead and eat it. If this is supposed to be a site with expert answers, I hate to see this kind of dangerous and misinformed "information". I don't care when people have random ideas about obscure uses for ...


2

Don't forget that we are not an official body and we don't need to have a party line. If the world disagrees about what is safe, then we will probably get conflicting answers too. This is completely OK. It is what the voting system is here for. Answers which are obviously crazy should get downvoted. As for the rest, if we have two camps (e.g. sunny side up ...


2

This sounds like a good fit for Gardening & Landscaping Stack Exchange. As per the site’s Help Center: This site is for professional and amateur gardeners and landscapers to ask questions about the care and maintenance of gardens and landscapes. If your question is about: the general care and feeding of plants; gardening problems ...


2

First of all: Thank you very much for actually taking the tour before posting! That said, our sister site Medical Sciences could be what you are looking for. From their help: What topics can I ask about here? If your question is about... Environmental or nutritional factors that affect health The ways that diseases and injuries affect ...


2

A little later in answering this, but as someone who has answered a lot of food safety questions on this site and who has spent a lot of time reading detailed scientific sources on food safety in the process of writing answers, I can conclusively say a few things: Most people's intuition about food safety is wrong in many cases. They may be right in most ...


2

I agree that this kind of questions only generates noise. I have the feeling that these people know that their case is unsafe by regular food safety guidelines, but don't want to throw out the expensive ingredients, so they just look around for confirmation. The problem is that this creates an unwanted responsibility for the person who answers. So anybody ...


1

There is no "egg safety problem." The evidence is overwhelming that the US safety practices for eggs are at least no worse than those in Europe not counting Sweden, where eggs are washed. The EU is considering requiring egg washing per this article in Food Production Daily. There is no credible evidence presented (or that I found, given the difficulty of ...


1

The real core subject of the question seems to be about "popular understandings of food safety, and the scientific/legal truth or untruth behind them". I can see how this would be relevant to an amateur or professional cook or chef, given he has some responsibility for the eater's safety, and should answer such concerns responsibly and correctly...


1

My general understanding is that part of why we close so many "is this thing I left on the counter/in the car/crock pot didn't turn on still safe to eat" as a dupe is that we can not be liable for giving people unsafe food consumption advice. If someone follows an answer that says "ah, I've never gotten sick and I do that all the time"... and then gets ...


1

Perhaps there may be formulations of that question which would have been acceptable... but we are under no obligation to read the posters mind. There was no hint of pasteurized or unpasteurized as the core issue. There was no hint that foods not considered generally safe were under consideration. The core issue, as clearly stated by the OP, was the ...


1

First, I'm not a lawyer. StackExchange is in the US, and should be protected from liability by §230 of the Communications Decency Act. That protects SE, not the poster, though.


1

Long ago, I started this thread, What do I need to know about temperature and food safety? But it seems to have died out without me following around and sending people there. I don't know if a newer, better one has been created, but I thought then (and think now) that there should be such a page or section of the wiki.


1

What I find worrying in those questions is that, changing the values for X, Y, Z you get a completely different answer for which, then, the answer is always yes or no. Even if the answer would be explain the reason why is not safe, I don't think the reasons would be so different between questions. (I doubt somebody would ever say it's not safe because a ...


1

The 'funny' thing is that normally, when somebody asks that question, they know the answer in their own hearts: 'No, it's not safe'. People are looking for an excuse to go ahead and ignore their inner warnings. I'd go with the 'official' view, explain about exponential bacteria growth, explain about botulism, explain about inner temperature of the product, ...


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