12

In general, the downvoting here is a very good thing. I even think that there isn't enough of it. It is important feedback. Keeping back important negative feedback out of fear to hurt someone's feelings is a terrible strategy, here and everywhere else. It makes the non-critiqued person feel nicer in the short term, but makes learning impossible, effectively ...


12

Statistically, our site receives about 40 upvotes for every downvote, a figure which seems to be loosely applicable across most of the Stack Exchange network. That means two things: Chances are, you will receive some downvotes, eventually. Somebody is going to disagree with you for reasons that may or may not be clear at the time. So don't sweat it if you ...


7

This is a good type of question, and not at all off topic. We would be happy to have it. The one caveat is that you should know what "X" is and be able to describe it. So, question which work well would say something like: Here's the recipe for my sweet oven omelette with strawberries. I want it to be fluffier and for the strawberry taste to come more ...


7

The salient instruction for when to downvote an answer is "This answer is not useful". Since you raised your answer about frying potatoes as an example: I love fried potatoes and have been making them for ages. I usually use red potatoes and never pre-cook them; I just chop them, add them to a large saucepan or wok with 1/4 - 1/2 cup of heated vegetable ...


6

Closing questions is an essential part of Stack Exchange and there is no reason to be "not big" on it. That being said, the perceived intent of the author is one of the few reasons which really don't justify closure. Evaluating content on its objective merits is precisely what the FAQ and the SE model is promoting. It doesn't matter who asked it, or why, ...


5

No, that kind of questions is very clearly off topic. We are primarily cooks here. Our common interest is food. We can not give medical advice, in fact, many questions of the “Is X healthy?” type are not answerable for medical professionals. The types of questions we will accept here are: Questions with a limited scope and measurable, scientifically ...


5

Anyone can edit this post - add your suggestions here. Cooking techniques: sous-vide/low-temperature molecular-gastronomy (though some seem to hate this term, and prefer something else like modernist) dairy-free food-preservation (canning, pickling, etc.) deep-frying (done: January 3–10, 2012) catering/bulk-cooking (done: April 3-10, 2012) gluten-free (...


4

Asking about keeping onions would not be a duplicate of the tomato question. There are questions on the site though regarding onions that may be a duplicate.


4

It sounds like you are trying to ask about cooking, but it's not a great question yet because it's really broad. Asking how to do any one cooking task faster is a great cooking question, and doesn't just apply to restaurants. Asking about how to plan and organize cooking tasks and fit them all in is also a good cooking question. (The bit about whether they ...


3

Questions that were edited after being put on hold do go in the reopen queue, and yours was indeed in the queue, and has collected two reopen votes! But given the rather small number of users who review that queue (hint hint, high-rep folks) it can take a while for questions to get up to five votes. So if you want it to get reopened, the best thing to do is ...


3

The way I see it: you wanted to get certain information, and asked a question about it. Part of the information you wanted was to know whether the contents of a certain drink are suitable for swelling up in your stomach and reducing your appetite (which is a physiological effect of a certain type of dietary fiber). I understand that this information is ...


3

First of all, it's difficult to tell exactly what you're trying to ask here, but I'm assuming that you want to know a little more about what's on and off topic on our site, and get your question into an appropriate form. I'm sure rumtscho will show up and offer her thoughts, but for now, here's what I can see. It does look like there was some unfortunately ...


2

Does he get penalized for admitting that he doesn't care? Do we have to start subjectively evaluating the sincerity of all questions? Asking good questions just for rep doesn't seem like a bad thing- it's kind of a natural consequence of awarding rep for questions in the first place. Asking questions that you already know the answer to even seems encouraged ...


2

Given the apparently low participation 1 day before the finish, my feelings are: We need a way to get more people to notice this promotion. We're actually getting some pretty decent traffic on the main site these days, but this meta thread has had only 60 views, which is pathetic. Thoughts, ideas? I also think that we might, in the beginning, need to choose ...


2

First of all: Thank you very much for actually taking the tour before posting! That said, our sister site Medical Sciences could be what you are looking for. From their help: What topics can I ask about here? If your question is about... Environmental or nutritional factors that affect health The ways that diseases and injuries affect ...


2

It's very easy to find on the web what a rubber spatula is, but the question wasn't asking what a rubber spatula is, it was asking to identify the utensil in a photo. You don't specify how you would have proposed that the OP search for an answer through alternative means, and I don't see any obvious route. "Equipment identification" is going to be more or ...


2

The beauty of generic questions is also their Achilles heel - they are generic. In some cases, a generic Q/A serves as catch-all for what is repeatedly asked, especially by new users that don’t research before posting. We all know the “I left [perishable item] in [someplace warmer than a fridge] for [random time]” questions and closing them as duplicate not ...


1

Yes, the main site is the correct place for this sort of discussion. However, as I am sure you have, given your reputation; please read the help center and keep the questions specific/on-topic. Broad questions seeking opinion are usually not on-topic (though often discussed widely).


1

I am afraid that your question as stated are dishes like risotto or beef Wellington really hard to cook ill have to be closed. It doesn't matter if you refer to a cook show or not. But all StackExchange sites close subjective questions, and this is one of the most subjective questions I have seen. A dish can be called "hard to cook" for you if your ...


1

While your questions are obviously inspired by the show, they don't seem like they're really about the show at their core. These questions are really just of the form "What makes X difficult, what typically goes wrong, how do I avoid it?" Questions like that are fine, as long as they're not overly broad. We don't want something like "please give me your ...


1

That one bugged me, and I was disinclined to answer it. It seemed too obvious to be taken seriously. I did answer it and the upvotes and comments made it worth my while. That indicates something, doesn't it? Answers to really, really stupid questions don't get upvoted.* *Apparently wrong, but sounded good when written.


1

Low research questions are discouraged, although they don't have to be closed outright. However, there is a difference between "low research" and "beginner" questions. "Low research" is something where the user had a very obvious source and didn't check it. For example, if somebody bought a new espresso automatic machine and asks us how to make cappucchino ...


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