19

For me, this is still on topic. Our help center states: Cooking & food preparation methods Food handling and storage I would argue that it can even fall into both categories. We cooks buy lobsters as live animals and storing and ultimately killing them is actually part of the food preparation process. Another example are mussles. While most ...


17

I believe these questions should be considered off-topic if the gist of the plant identification question is "is this edible?". Because we're food specialists and not necessarily plant specialists, it's completely possible for us to miss-identify something as "edible" that is not. As in the question, it's possible that it's a perfectly edible peppermint......


9

So, this type of question actually has a sort of history of its own on the Stack Exchange network; the controversy originally started on the Gaming site with What is the point of "help me remember this game" questions?, in which the following arguments were presented against the questions: They're very localized; it's unlikely that somebody else will find ...


9

We do equipment questions here, so I think the question you mean will be on-topic. Some equipment questions don't fare that well here, but it is mostly ones which are way too model specific for anybody but the manufacturer to say something about them. A common problem of grills should be OK - just ask it.


8

Might be a little esoteric as far as getting a reliable answer is concerned, but certainly, questions about the science of cooking are on topic, and questions about the effects of cooking on nutritional properties, such as this one about Vitamin C, are no problem at all.


8

No, we don't generally take questions about the business aspects of making food, just the culinary ones. I'm sure there would end up being some overlap, but we definitely don't cover it all. (Your two example questions are off topic here, to start with.) Whether or not that means there's enough interest to get a hospitality site going, I don't know!


7

Yes let's close those, and point to a canonical question that points to everyone's favorite calculators. It's helpful and if they're dups we don't have to keep convincing people they're bad questions.


7

I think my views are pretty clear here: food history is an interesting food-related subject, and questions about it are in general on-topic and quite answerable, with some care to get real facts, not just rumors and speculation. The question you linked to about western meal structure is a great example of a question, though it could certainly have a more ...


7

Your answer is fine. Had the answer consisted solely of the MC Hammer picture, I would have fully supported the answer being deleted. But there's nothing wrong with having a sense of humor while answering the question - key part being the answering the question bit, which you did. Part of the issue here might be that the person who edited didn't think the ...


7

This is a good type of question, and not at all off topic. We would be happy to have it. The one caveat is that you should know what "X" is and be able to describe it. So, question which work well would say something like: Here's the recipe for my sweet oven omelette with strawberries. I want it to be fluffier and for the strawberry taste to come more ...


6

Please see the nutritient-composition tag wiki for full information about current policy. The very short version is that specific questions about specific nutritional content in a culinary context (e.g. "How does ripeness of a fruit affect the amount of sugar it has?") are okay, but anything which explicitly or implicitly asks for any sort of information ...


6

I would argue that all sourcing questions fall into one of two categories: They are extremely local and require extremely local knowledge They are better served by a general internet search with google, bing, or whatever None of them require specific culinary or cooking knowledge, as opposed to a question on how to choose an ingredient or piece of ...


6

Sure, that's what the budget-cooking tag is for. Please do note, however, that all of the usual expectations around specificity and constructiveness still apply. So questions of the form recommend me some cheap meal ideas/restaurants will be closed, not because they are off-topic but because they are polls. I point out the above because the budget-cooking ...


5

Fermented foods are on topic. You are welcome to ask about miso, and also other fermented food such as sauerkraut and pickles. I guess the confusion may come from the point Wine-making, Brewing, Distillation and Fermentation This means that the site doesn't cover the making of alcoholic beverages from scratch, such as making your own beer. The "...


5

Yes, I would consider that on topic. And here is an identical type of question on the home page.


5

Another element to consider, I think, is that we often don't recognize how culturally conditioned our food expectations (and food preparation expectations) are until someone points out a different way -- either from another culture or from some period in history. For example, a question like "Why do we knead bread dough?" could at first seem like a simple ...


5

Requests for help with flavor pairings or modifying a recipe must make a reasonable effort to describe the specific goal. In other words, these would be closed: What can I add to X to make it better? What are some common/uncommon ingredients to add to X? How can I improve the flavor/texture of X? What goes well with X? If your question is like those, this ...


5

It turns out that most people aren't any good at searching the web, especially once what they're looking for is becomes non-trivial. This, I suppose, isn't a surprise to anyone who's spent any time answering questions on the SE Network. And, although I feel I'm usually pretty good at finding stuff on the Internet myself (citation needed, certainly), there ...


5

The purpose of the rules is to avoid unanswerable questions. The kind that solicit opinion based answers or unending lists of equally valid answers. In my opinion the rule of thumb is- would this question produce answers that could be objectively voted up or would they have any value to someone searching for the same question on Google. I am sad when a ...


4

Not unless there's some subtle or tenuous connection to the cooking process that I'm not anticipating. We do seem to have a biology site on the network now; if your question is at a reasonably technical research-ish level then you could try asking there, although I suspect, like most of the other science sites, that it'd get closed if it's deemed overly ...


4

My inclination here is no, we should deem these examples off-topic under the "what can I do with X" custom close reason. If no dish would normally contain large quantities of X, however, that might fit under the "no culinary uses" exception. (That's not the case with eggs or almonds, I don't think.) Note also that "how can I preserve X?" may well be a good ...


4

One small correction: this isn't a moderator thing. We have plenty of users with enough reputation to help close questions, and the site scope was decided by users, not just moderators. We moderators also contribute in this regard, but we're not in charge of site scope. Generally, the details have been refined over the years, but we haven't added a lot of ...


4

I'm kind of inclined to say no, let's not take them. I don't think anyone's ever been wild about these, and food laws are very localized, so people tend to not have the expertise to answer even if they do know something about the topic. They're also not relevant to home cooks, and we've already said that business questions and other non-culinary questions ...


3

Yes, we should answer questions about biology if they're useful in a culinary way. We answer questions about making food, including explanations of the reasons behind things, and sometimes we have to find those reasons in biology or chemistry. This is nothing new. This doesn't mean we should accept all tangentially food-related biology questions (e.g. "how ...


3

My 2 cents: With molecular gastronomy becoming a trendy cooking style, I feel like deep, esoteric questions related to food properties and preparation are perfectly valid--pushing the boundaries of accessible cooking. I personally welcome questions such as these.


3

No, it's off topic because it's not about something that people will reasonably be expected to eat. Similarly off topic would be: Questions about sugar glass How to make Caro syrup and food dye look more like zombie blood? How to prepare food for food photography? How to make homemade play-dough? How to make a salt sculpture?


3

I don't see how this is any different from the close explanation: Questions of the form "What can I do with [ingredient]?" are off-topic because they are subjective and lead to a long list of equally good suggestions, which is not compatible with the Stack Exchange format. See Culinary Uses Guidelines for details. Exceptions are made for items which are ...


3

I had a quick discussion with rumtscho in chat, arguing for allowing this sort of thing. She at least partially agrees! My overall view is that we should take questions like this, and clarify that they are asking for time/temperature ranges with descriptions of the results and not recipes. As a simple example, the table in this Serious Eats article for ...


2

I am against allowing the anthropological questions on the site. Not because they are not interesting - they are very interesting indeed. But because Cooks rarely have the expertise in this area They invite speculation ("Oh, it could be because... Let's write that idea down") The site visitors don't know the answer either, and vote for the answers which ...


2

Most prevelant cookbooks have a large section on history, including Modern Cuisine (counter to title). So there is an argument to be made. Perhaps the guage should be whether the question and answers will aid people in making better cooking (and food prep in general) decisions. Sometimes knowing the history allows one to challenge the methods or opposite, ...


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