0

I'd say about 3/4 of the questions tagged could easily be tagged instead, as they tend to be about thickening/thinning, lumpiness/smoothness, hardness/softness, that sort of thing.

Of the remaining questions, I really can't see the common thread. For example, How to avoid cinnamon sludge in a beverage? doesn't seem to share any similarities with Should scones be sticky?

If this tag does have an independent meaning, it seems to be lost on 9 out of 10 people who use the tag.

Can someone explain to me what the difference between and is supposed to be, and possibly recommend some alternative tag names that are less vague?

  • The two other examples you gave are also about texture/consistency - avoiding a sludgy texture/consistency in a drink, and whether dough should have a sticky texture/consistency. I think we're just more likely to say "consistency" for things like solids that we're not eating yet and for liquids. – Cascabel Aug 4 '13 at 14:45
  • "Texture" implies a solid surface. Some of the questions really may be about mouthfeel; others are clearly about viscosity, or at least sheer strength (but that is probably too technical to use as a tag!) – SAJ14SAJ Aug 4 '13 at 21:18
  • Consistency is extra-vague because it could be about getting the same results every time. – Peter Taylor Aug 5 '13 at 13:02
  • @SAJ14SAJ: I suppose that's correct as far as the dictionary definition goes, but the culinary definition applies to fluids as well (gels, foams, etc.) The most popular brand of emulsifiers and gelling agents is called "texturas", and it's not meant as irony. Viscosity is probably the more accurate term, and I'd propose that as a synonym; unfortunately, it's not the term that's in common use. I'm OK with mouthfeel in principle but I anticipate problems with discoverability and correct usage... – Aaronut Aug 6 '13 at 0:00
  • @PeterTaylor: That is one of the things I'm worried about, and in that respect it's actually more of a meta-tag than a legitimate subject-matter tag. – Aaronut Aug 6 '13 at 0:00

You must log in to answer this question.

Browse other questions tagged .